Beginners Guide to edgertronic high speed camera

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You have a cool high speed camera. Now what?

You have extensive photographic experience. That's great! You already understand shutter speed, aperture, depth of focus, ISO etc. On the other hand, you may just want to use the camera, but don't understand all that mumbo-jumbo. Either way, this guide will provide a quick introduction to high speed video and how to successfully use the edgertronic camera.

Settings: An Exercise of Balance
The edgertronic high speed camera provides settings which allow the user optimize the camera for the task at hand. Most of these settings are tradeoffs: changing a particular setting will improve one characteristic and simulteneously degrade another. Furthermore, these settings often interact with each other. An understanding of these tradeoffs and interactions will help you pick the best balance, of these settings, for your unique application.

Shutter: Light vs Motion
A shutter is a mechanical or electronic device that controls how long light is captured for each frame. For historical reasons, the shutter is specified in fractions of a second like 1/60. The edgertronic has an electronic shutter, and the shutter can be set from 1/10 to 1/250,000. Here's the first trade off you must manage: long shutters let in more light, but short shutters are better at freezing motion and allow higher frame rates.

Aperture: Light vs Depth-of-Field
The aperture is the part of the lens (iris) that can be opened or closed to let in more or less light. Turn the aperture ring and you'll see the iris open and close, admitting more or less light. Apertures are specified in F-stops like f2.8. The Nikon lens supplied with the edgertronic has an aperture range of f1.8 (large iris, most light) to f22 (small iris, least light). Here's the second tradeoff: there's a range of distances where objects are in focus, called Depth-of-Field (DOF). Large apertures like f1.8 let in the most light, but the DOF is very small. Conversely, smaller apertures like f22 let in less light, but the DOF is much larger.

ISO: Sensitivity vs Noise
The aperture is the part of the lens (iris) that can be opened or closed to let in more or less light. Turn the aperture ring and you'll see the iris open and close, admitting more or less light. Apertures are specified in F-stops like f2.8. The Nikon lens supplied with the edgertronic has an aperture range of f1.8 (large iris, most light) to f22 (small iris, least light). Here's the second tradeoff: there's a range of distances where objects are in focus, called Depth-of-Field (DOF). Large apertures like f1.8 let in the most light, but the DOF is very small. Conversely, smaller apertures like f22 let in less light, but the DOF is much larger.